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Back in the saddle? - Really long posts about nothing.

Jan. 5th, 2012

10:26 pm - Back in the saddle?

I want to update more, today had two articles I wanted to comment on.

14 year old runaway was 'found', turns out she gave a fake name to police and the name she gave was that of an illegal columbian with a warrant out for her arrest. The girl was deported and has been in a work program in Columbia. Everyone is up in arms about how this poor girl should have been found out before it came to that. But wait, this is a girl who gave a False Name, to the Police, upon being arrested. Three strikes against her, I'll bet she learned a little something about honesty there. And not getting arrested at 14.

Speaking of that, there was an 8th grade boy who was shot three times, and killed, in the act of brandishing a firearm at police. The dad wants to know why such excessive force' was used on his 15 year old boy. Er, 15? 8th grade? Aside from that, the trouble all started when this kid walked into school and punched a kid in the face. By the time the cops got there, he was pointing a BB gun at them, and would not drop it. "He's not a bad kid" the dad said. I do not call any kid who punches people in the face and gets into stand-offs with the cops 'good', but then I'm a hard ass like that. I'm not a fan of 15 year olds in 8th grade either.

And since I like to post in threes, compulsively... I did like todays note about cyber-baiting. The word is stupid, but if it garners attention to a long-standing problem, I'll embrace it. The problem is the unbounded freedom for kids (and adults) to be jackasses in the face of authority. Not enough of us support our teachers and cops and other public servants when kids (or immature adults) make a habit out of baiting 'professionals' until they snap, just so they can post their outburst on youtube. The current spotlight is on kids baiting teachers until the snap, so that the kids can get them fired. It's a game... more live-action than farmville, good on them, right? I'm sure not all will agree, but I think the basic right to education should be like the basic right to food stamps or medicare or any other government-provided welfare assistance. Public education was undertaken to ensure that even those who couldn't afford it could get a basic education. I think 'could' should be the operative word there. I see way too many parallels between the school system I went through, and the jail I worked in. If a kid (and/or their family) does not want to be in school, why are we forcing them to be in the same classes as kids who DO want to be there? If a kid, with all their free time and creativity, is hellbent on disrupting education and 'sticking it to the man', then send them home to their parents to teach them a trade. And by 'kid', I should note that today's news is 14 year olds and 8th graders getting deported under assumed names and having firearm standoffs with law enforcement. Not all 'kids' are created equal. Some are still innocent at age 30... others have amassed 120 felonies at age 12. I saw that kid on Jimmy Kimmel the other night. Mom said that some of those felonies were trumped up... as Jimmy noted, "Sure, only 80-90 felonies were legit, tops. Then he pointed out mom was in a Daytona Bike week shirt. I'll add that she didn't put on a bra for the interview... which shouldn't make her a bad person, but in the Society of Respectable Moms has convinced me that one -should- put on a bra for the TV cameras, even if you're more popular in Daytona when you go free-range.

And there you go... a quick overview of things in my mind. Maybe I won't be up late thinking about that deported girl. Mostly, I wonder if she was happier cleaning houses in Columbia than she was as an American teenager in school with those unreasonable homework demands.

Comments:

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From:fallconsmate
Date:January 6th, 2012 06:38 pm (UTC)
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15 years old in 8th grade is indeed possible. average age in 8th grade is 13. you put a birthday just past the cutoff, and that brings the kid to 14. held back one year? 15.

it sounds worse than it can be. (my daughter's b-day was a month after the cutoff date. she graduated at 19 years old.)
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From:diermuid
Date:January 6th, 2012 07:18 pm (UTC)
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I knew it was possible, just not indicative of a 'pretty good kid' as his dad had classified him. He did have some things going for him like working with the church and not being deeply involved with gangs... but then Dennis Radar was a church deacon and Cub Scout leader... but all of the other stuff sort of outweighs that. ;-)
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From:fallconsmate
Date:January 6th, 2012 09:50 pm (UTC)
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My son is a pretty good kid...who got held back for being too immature for the class. ;)

It's all in the backstory, and in knowing what's in the mind. And who knows all of what's in someone else's mind?
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From:diermuid
Date:January 6th, 2012 10:20 pm (UTC)
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I was held back twice. Some thought I was a pretty good kid. There was a darker side to it, but that got glossed over. I suppose it's all relative though, 'pretty good kid' meant he wasn't known for going drugs or gangbanging. I think of "pretty good kid" as the sort who does pretty well in school, academically, emotionally, behaviorally. I suspect there may have been some bullying involved, but one does not go from good kid to assault and armed standoff in the course of 15 mins.

And here's why it rubs me the wrong way - I get to deal with "Pretty good kids" a lot, we had one 15 year old that exposed himself and tried to rub himself on some of our 11-12 year old scouts. Sexual assault, battery, threats & intimidation, all sorts of fun. When our scout leaders finally tracked down the 15 year old, his leader was just going to put him in his tent for the night... "He's a pretty good kid." Bull. The warning signs had all been whitewashed, the kid was rapidly becoming a menace to society, but we enable our kids to stretch further if they don't get strung up by us before they have to be strung up by law enforcement. In that particular boy's case, it -did- go to law enforcement, so while the enabling adults around him can still say "he's a pretty good kid", local law enforcement is aware that he does not always play nicely with others.

So forgive me if I'm a bit wary of kids that are "pretty good", then suddenly have a -real- bad day. Kids are not as innocent as we'd like them to be. Some are, sure. many are not.
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From:fallconsmate
Date:January 6th, 2012 10:36 pm (UTC)
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oh, we're in absolute agreement.

kids arent THAT innocent.
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